Tongue Cancer, Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Young People, Do you have it? Survive It!

My website: www.wakeyourhealthup.com
Book released soon!

I will show you pictures of my tongue cancer. Tongue cancer images of a young non-smoker, non-drinker are not easy to find online, so here you go. This is a photo album which acts as a timeline starting from my cancer diagnosis Halloween 2011 until my recovery one year later 2013. The most important thing is to diagnose EARLY and you will have a successful journey getting it removed and living life again!

For more tips on self-screening, check out my friends site: ww.sixstepscreening.org/oral-cancer/

Understanding the causative factors of cancer will contribute to prevention of the disease. Age is frequently named as a risk factor for oral cancer, as historically it occurs in those over the age of 40. The age of diagnosed patients may indicate a time component in the biochemical or biophysical processes of aging cells that allows malignant transformation, or perhaps, immune system competence diminishes with age. Very recent data (late 2008-2011) lead us to believe that the fastest growing segment of the oral cancer population are non-smokers under the age of fifty, which would indicate a paradigm shift in the cause of the disease, and in the locations where it most frequently occurs in the oral environment. The anterior of the mouth, tobacco and alcohol associated cancers have declined along with a corresponding decline in smoking, and posterior of the oral cavity sites associated with the HPV16 viral cause are increasing.

However, it is likely that the accumulative damage from other factors, such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and persistent viral infections such as HPV, are the real culprits. It may take several decades of smoking for instance, to precipitate the development of a cancer. Having said that, tobacco use in all its forms is number one on the list of risk factors in individuals over 50. Historically at least 75% of those diagnosed at 50 and older have been tobacco users. This percentage is now changing, and exact percentages are yet to be definitively determined and published, as new data related to viral causes are changing the demographics very rapidly. When you combine tobacco with heavy use of alcohol, your risk is significantly increased, as the two act synergistically. Those who both smoke and drink, have a 15 times greater risk of developing oral cancer than others. More about tobacco and alcohol It does not appear that the HPV16 viral cause acts synergistically with tobacco or alcohol, and HPV16 represents a completely unique and independent disease process.

Song in Video:
The Prayer (Acroostic Mix)
Jephté Guillaume
Rough Guide To Global Dance

Just after the 1st surgery:
http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/facts/index.htm

Try my other videos for more info:
just after surgery

one year update:

juicing for tongue cancer:

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